Your Ever Loving Theatre

4 stars

In 1974 Paul Hill, alongside three acquaintances, was jailed for his role in the Guildford and Woolwich pub bombings – which left seven dead, and many more maimed. But he had nothing to do with it. The Guildford Four were victims of a notorious miscarriage of justice, and weren’t freed until 1989. Your Ever Loving tells Hill’s story, through the letters he sent to his mother and other family members.

Review by Stephen Walker published on Thursday 17 August | Read more

Lemons Lemons Lemons Lemons Lemons Theatre

4 stars

In Lemons Lemons Lemons Lemons Lemons, the government is legislating to limit everyone to 140 spoken words a day. Against this intriguing and arbitrary limit on communication, a love story plays out. Playwright Sam Steiner has written a thoughtful, intelligent play, and one that is brought to life with real warmth in the performance.

Review by Stephen Walker published on Thursday 17 August | Read more

Leaf Theatre

2 stars

Leaf is a fast-paced student sketch show that sows the seeds of comic ideas, but struggles to take root. With an enthusiastic band of performers, who throw their all into the eclectic mash of scenes (or are they daydreams?), it drifts somewhat in the direction of absurdism – but struggles to sustain its momentum and fails to land.

Review by Liam McKenna published on Wednesday 16 August | Read more

My Name is Irrelevant Theatre

4 stars

It’s not every day that someone explains their loneliness, and what it means for their wellbeing. Here Matthew Leonard Hall takes us on a journey through the machinations of his mind in a compelling and creative depiction of loneliness.

He says the show took "sweat and tears" to develop, and it’s to be believed. It’s an intense hour – stifling at times, as well as moving. It oozes the care Hall has taken in its details. Apart from its role in raising awareness of a little-talked-about subject, this is also a fantastic example of creative storytelling.

Review by Catherine Meek published on Wednesday 16 August | Read more

Ballistic Theatre

3 stars

Ballistic is a one-man play about a mass shooter, told entirely from his own perspective. It's based on the manifesto written by the real life mass-murderer Elliot Rodger, but the story told is fictional; the rampant narcissism and misogyny-laced entitlement of the unnamed protagonist is ably, and disturbingly, portrayed by Mark Conway.

Review by Caroline Cawley published on Wednesday 16 August | Read more

Buried: A New Musical Musicals & Opera

5 stars

Buried: A New Musical tells the story of Harry and Rose, a couple who meet through an online dating service – only to discover they are, in fact, both serial killers. A darkly comic tale unfolds as the pair try to balance a normal relationship with their murderous activities. Written by Tom Williams and Cordelia O’Driscoll, it's the first original production from Sheffield-based Colla Voce Theatre.

Review by Caroline Cawley published on Wednesday 16 August | Read more

Spirit of the Dane Comedy

2 stars

My Fringe Resolution this year was to avoid Hamlet like the plague, but it came to a crashing halt on my first day in town. I was tempted off my chosen path by Spirit of the Dane, which promised "a hilarious romp through the peculiar minds of two of Shakespeare's greatest characters". Tony Cronin (Hamlet) and Julia McLivane (Lady Macbeth) certainly find numerous ways to poke fun at Shakespeare’s most arduously monologue play.

Review by Ellen Macpherson published on Wednesday 16 August | Read more

Tom and Bunny Save the World Theatre

4 stars

Even at the Edinburgh Fringe, there can't have been many zombie apocalypse folk musicals, making Tom and Bunny Save the World an intriguing proposition. And the show certainly stakes a memorable claim on the genre, with a lively hour of bawdiness, songs and awkward sex jokes. There's even quite a lot of plot delivered at break-neck speed.

Review by Jane Bristow published on Wednesday 16 August | Read more

Dane Baptiste: G.O.D. (Gold. Oil. Drugs.) Comedy

4 stars

Dane Baptiste has become so good at constructing intelligent shows that he starts this one as you would an essay: by describing what he's going to talk about – convenience, materialism and highs. After which he goes on to expand upon them all, in the order stated, and then says he's done it. Perhaps it's the August timing – straight after nationwide exams – that makes this so appealing. And at each juncture Baptiste has points to make, tightly written and playful, with an underlying emphasis on respect for all.

Review by Victoria Nangle published on Wednesday 16 August | Read more

We Are Not a Muse Theatre

3 stars

Gentlemen publishers Tite and Snobbo have had enough of women in feminist literature, and their failure to accept their rightful place as subservient to men. So they’ve come up with a clever shredder, that takes out everything they don’t like from the texts and puts what's left back together in more appropriate form. In We Are Not A Muse, Proxy Moon Theatre have hit upon the neat trick of parodying patriarchy in reverse.

Review by Stephen Walker published on Wednesday 16 August | Read more

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