Waiting for a review of your show? We do have a few still to publish – they're working their way through our system and should all be out by the end of the weekend. We're sorry for the delay, and thank you for your patience.

Seanmhair Theatre

4 stars

Seanmhair is the Gaelic word for "grandmother". Hywel John’s new play is about grandmotherly instincts, love in an old Edinburgh, and the overarching theme of the role of women in society. Seven main characters are played by three women; aided by a gothic set and haunting poetic writing, this is a powerful production.

Molly Vevers plays the ten-year-old Jenny, who is shy and awkward but full of pluck. Hannah McPake plays her Victorian grandmother, and does a terrific job of portraying the sternness of her background but also her overwhelming matriarchal love.

Review by Udita Banerjee published on Wednesday 23 August | Read more

2016 the Musical Musicals & Opera

3 stars

2016: The Musical is a show of ups and downs. The choreography and dancing is excellent, but the singing is staggeringly poor. Some of the song lyrics sound like mediocre improvisation, yet others are hilarious. The spoken sketches seem under-rehearsed compared to the singing and dancing, and on the particular day I attended the actors made several mistakes. These students from the University of Bristol clearly have talent, and the show is upbeat and feel-good – but it’s quite rough around the edges.

Review by Elsa Maishman published on Wednesday 23 August | Read more

Death on the Nile Theatre

4 stars

When the leaflet handed out just before I enter a show boldly proclaims ‘Celebrating 18 years at the Fringe,’ my expectations are high. And Livewire Theatre doesn’t disappoint with its new take on Agatha Christie’s Poirot, set against the backdrop of Egypt in the 20s.

Review by Udita Banerjee published on Wednesday 23 August | Read more

Hide Theatre

3 stars

Based very loosely on the story of Jekyll and Hyde, Hide is set 15 years after Henry Jekyll's experiments – 15 years since, they say, he unleashed his serum on society and broke everyone's self into eight 'vapours'. The government says that only a mysterious 'device' can save people, rebalancing these vapours and making everyone wholly suited to their life 'path'. They say being assigned a path removes the terrible burden of choice; they say it allows people to best serve society; they say it is necessary. But not everyone believes what they say.

Review by Lizzie Bell published on Wednesday 23 August | Read more

The Room at the Top of the House Theatre

4 stars

Josh lives in his parents' attic, watching people going past, looking at the garden and wishing he could leave. His sister Sam is travelling the world; she sends postcards, hoping to give him a reason to follow her. His Dad gives him the travel section to look at, his Mum tries encourage him down for dinner… and they all worry about his future.

Review by Lizzie Bell published on Wednesday 23 August | Read more

All My Life Long Theatre

2 stars

All My Life Long is about Gloria and Padraic, who are friends and decide that they will meet up on the second of March every year. The show then goes from one year to another and traces the lives of the two, their hopes and dreams and failures. Except that it doesn’t quite do that.

Review by Udita Banerjee published on Wednesday 23 August | Read more

Aditi Mittal: Global Village Idiot Comedy

4 stars

Stand-up comedy that isn’t slapstick, but more of a social, political and cultural commentary, is a relatively new business in India. And as one of the first women to boldly ride that wave, Aditi Mittal has made quite the name for herself. Known for her wry humour and sharp tongue, this self-confessed ‘global village idiot’ is at the Fringe for the first time this year, all the way from Mumbai.

Review by Udita Banerjee published on Wednesday 23 August | Read more

Caravaggio: Between the Darkness Theatre

3 stars

Caravaggio was one of the most famous Italian painters of the 15th and 16th centuries. This new biographical play about the final years of his life combines, like his paintings, light and darkness, along with a manic energy that infuses both his life and his work as he runs from the law.

Review by Udita Banerjee published on Tuesday 22 August | Read more

Ray Bradshaw: Deaf Comedy Fam Comedy

4 stars

Ray Bradshaw is a great observational comic; his material covers everything from the best thing he's seen at the Fringe, to what happened when he played an adoption trick on his brother. But there is one thing that particularly stands out about this show: it is bilingual, performed in BSL (British Sign Language) and English. Whether you speak one or both, it will have you laughing out loud.

Review by Lizzie Bell published on Tuesday 22 August | Read more

The Sky Is Safe Theatre

5 stars

‘We have men in power and the country is destroyed.’ It’s a powerful first line, which sets the scene for this ‘play for a woman and a man’ by Matthew Zajac – an original view of Syria as told by women who ‘arrived in Turkey with nothing but ourselves’. Zajac weaves a narrative from the stories of Syrian refugee women he interviewed in the commercial centre of Istanbul, the setting for the play.

Review by Catherine Meek published on Tuesday 22 August | Read more

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