Waiting for a review of your show? We do have a few still to publish – they're working their way through our system and should all be out by the end of the weekend. We're sorry for the delay, and thank you for your patience.

For the School Colours: The Life and Works of Angela Brazil Theatre

3 stars

For the School Colours: The Life and Works of Angela Brazil is a new play from Not Cricket Productions, chronicling the life of Angela Brazil – a prolific children’s author who popularised the genre of schoolgirl stories. The show is broken down into a number of short scenes and scenarios, framed by a narrative of Brazil’s life.

Review by Caroline Cawley published on Saturday 19 August | Read more

Dickless Theatre

4 stars

Saff is not having a great day. Attacked by her acquaintance Judy, over an alleged – and later triumphantly confirmed – romantic tryst with Judy’s sort-of-boyfriend Oli, she retreats to her home shared with her parents. But this is only the beginning of a chaotic night in middle England’s Dunningham.

Dickless is a one-woman show written by Aisha Josiah, and presented by the Fundamental Theater Company. The show is alternately performed by one of two actresses, and on the night I attended it was Lauren Downie on stage.

Review by Caroline Cawley published on Friday 18 August | Read more

Mirror, Mirror, Off the Wall Theatre

3 stars

Stepping onto the stage, our storytellers welcome the audience. They are concise, energetic and slightly mysterious – which is exactly the essence of Mirror, Mirror, Off the Wall. Theatre group On Your Nerve stage a series of fairy tales with a twist, with four actors taking on a range of different characters to tell a larger story.

Review by Abi Love published on Friday 18 August | Read more

Penthouse Theatre

3 stars

I'm not sure what to make of Penthouse. It under-runs by 15 minutes, and the plot ends abruptly, with little sense of completion; some interesting themes begin to emerge, but none of them goes very far. It just doesn't feel finished – which is a big shame, because what we do see is striking, unexpectedly subtle, and consistently well-performed.

Review by Richard Stamp published on Friday 18 August | Read more

A Great Fear of Shallow Living Theatre

4 stars

I can’t say I know much about Selkie lore – but it's a topic I want to learn more about, and I wasn’t disappointed by A Great Fear of Shallow Living. By bringing modernity to Celtic tradition, In Tandem Theatre Company invites us to question fantasy and reality, through a captivating performance brought to life with splendid live music.

Review by Abi Love published on Friday 18 August | Read more

Victorian Gothic Theatre

3 stars

A clock strikes eleven – much later, we'll learn the significance of that hour – and a man with moustache and mutton-chops walks onto the stage. A man, not a gentleman; this is Inspector Albert Thorne, who's spent his life policing the parts of London where the Victorian monied classes dare not tread. He's here to tell that story, to speak for the disadvantaged… and inevitably, he reveals a few things about his own life along the way.

Review by Richard Stamp published on Friday 18 August | Read more

The Friday Night Effect Theatre

3 stars

The Friday Night Effect follows three young-ish women – flatmates living somewhere in Ireland – as they prepare for and then head out to a night on the town. By the end of the play, we're told, one of them might die. It's only a "might", because the plot isn't fixed yet; at crucial points the action stops, and we the audience are invited to vote on what a particular character should do.

Review by Richard Stamp published on Friday 18 August | Read more

Wandering Bones Theatre

3 stars

Wandering Bones is new drama written and performed by Kym Hunt of Mangonel Theatre. It tells the story of John Adam who, in 1835, moved to the Highlands of Scotland and murdered a woman there. The story encompasses his life from a few years before the tumultuous events, to over 165 years after his death.

Review by Caroline Cawley published on Friday 18 August | Read more

Frozen Theatre

4 stars

There is little more traumatic and devastating for a parent than losing a child. Frozen is a play that revolves around a mother’s journey as she comes to terms with the disappearance of her 10-year-old daughter, the aftermath of her death, and the struggles around the need to forgive and move on.

Review by Udita Banerjee published on Friday 18 August | Read more

Parentcraft Theatre

3 stars

They say you become a father the day your baby is born, but you become a mother the day your baby is conceived. Many cultures, indeed many religions, give a mother the purest, highest stature. Parentcraft (a play by Stephen Smith) is a show about becoming a parent, including some of the less glorified elements of motherhood in particular.

Review by Udita Banerjee published on Friday 18 August | Read more

Pages