Every choice we make, every decision we take, has an alternative. This show hinges on that moment of decision and brings to mind Robert Frost's famous poem: ‘Two roads diverged in a wood, and I / I took the one less travelled by, / And that has made all the difference.’

This production from the Jim Harbourne Group is abstract; be prepared to not grasp every single piece of the puzzle that is the life of the four characters presented to us. But as a whole, this is a wonderful production about the moment of truth that faces us all from time to time. Music is central to the storytelling, and a number of oriental and western instruments are used: the harmonium, a flute, two guitars and others. There is a nice balance of tunes that sound like they come from far away, and those that seem familiar in Scotland.

And unlike a lot of productions, which are showing some understandable fatigue towards the end of their Fringe run, composer Jim Harbourne and fellow performer Kirsty Ella McIntyre seemed to enjoy themselves thoroughly as they played and sang for us. They are both excellent musicians, and the songs are lovely. It is very hard to believe that this is Harbourne’s first foray into theatre, and I am hoping it will not be his last, as there is a wonderful finesse in timing that is so hard to achieve.

This show is certainly best suited to an audience that likes loose threads in the narrative, and poetry. It takes a reasonable amount of creative liberty with the free-flowing, sometimes stream-of-consciousness script.

But even so, overall, I am pleased with the light-hearted feeling it leaves me with as I'm cast back to the outside mundane world. This is a perfect candidate to end the Fringe with – quietly poignant and reflective, a gentle nudge back to reality. It is surely one of the more entertaining hours that this ‘Demonstration Room’ has seen.