We're still publishing reviews from Fringe 2018. We're sorry about the delay, but if we saw your show on a press ticket, there will be a write-up. Do get in touch with us if you have any questions.

Showmanship Theatre

It’s 1935 and in Dust Bowl America, Myra Collins, a fortune teller with a travelling circus, plies her trade. She has no supernatural gifts, but she looks the part and has the necessary showmanship. And anyway, all anyone wants is a little hope – and that she can provide.

Review by Caroline Cawley published on Thursday 6 September | Read more

Games by Henry Naylor Theatre

In 1936, the Olympic Games were held in Germany – famously seen by the Nazi leaders as a platform to prove their racist theory of Aryan supremacy. In order to appease the international outcry on the strict race criteria for the German team, one athlete with a Jewish father, Helene Mayer, was allowed to compete for Germany. This play is about the lead up to the 1936 Olympic Games as experienced by Mayer, a world class fencer, and another Jewish athlete, high-jumper Gretel Bergmann (who was excluded from the Games themselves).

Review by Caroline Cawley published on Thursday 6 September | Read more

Stitch in Time: A Knitting Cabaret Music

With the arrival of the World Wars, and people keen to do their patriotic duty, knitting gained favour. The troops and refugees needed socks and gloves – and many people took up their needles to help. And as the popularity of sheet music also grew, so too came the knitting songs: from romantic to humorous, they are as varied as the knitters themselves.

Review by Lizzie Bell published on Thursday 6 September | Read more

Urban Death Theatre

Urban Death is a collection of horror-inspired vignettes, replete with gratuitous nudity and lots of fake blood. There is no overarching theme, outside of horror, and there isn’t a point to the show except to try and shock the audience; something it mostly failed at.

Review by Caroline Cawley published on Thursday 6 September | Read more

The Mould That Changed the World Musicals & Opera

Welcome to the UN conference on anti-microbial resistance! We are all familiar with antibiotics, and the worry about them becoming ineffective – but do we know the story behind them? This musical travels from the trenches of the First World War through to the present day, to give us a look at the history of antibiotics.

Review by Lizzie Bell published on Thursday 6 September | Read more

A Joke Theatre

Three men dressed in white find themselves in a world of white furniture, draped with white cloth. Who are they, where are they, and why are they? Are they just the stereotypes of a joke – the type of joke that starts ‘There’s an Englishman, an Irishman and a Scotsman? And if they are in a joke, how do they get out?

Review by Caroline Cawley published on Thursday 6 September | Read more

Fear Itself Theatre

Dr Amelia Greenwood is a renowned psychologist, who has sold at least thirteen books! She is going to help the audience confront and conquer their fear. All while dealing with the emotional ramifications of her recent divorce, made somewhat more difficult by the fact her ex is contracted to do her tech.

Review by Caroline Cawley published on Thursday 6 September | Read more

An Elephant in the Garden by Michael Morpurgo Theatre

When Dresden is bombed at the beginning of 1945, 16-year-old Lizzie and her mother must escape from the city. Accompanying them is an elephant from the zoo, which is, naturally, named after Marlene Dietrich. On their travels they meet a downed Allied airman and a homeless children’s choir; desperately, they race to meet the Allies, whilst avoiding Nazi soldiers and the Soviet Army. But how quickly can you go when your pace is set by a zoo animal?

Review by Caroline Cawley published on Thursday 6 September | Read more

The Famous Five Children's

The Famous Five – Julian, Dick, Anne, George and Timmy the dog – are packing up Kirrin Cottage as they are moving away. However, George (never Georgina!) doesn’t want to leave; after all, Kirrin is the site of so many of their adventures, including their very first. The Five then reminisce about the summer when they first met each other, in a faithful authorised adaptation of the first book Five on a Treasure Island by Enid Blyton.

Review by Caroline Cawley published on Thursday 6 September | Read more

The Archive of Educated Hearts Theatre

This quiet but powerful show, conceived and performed by Casey Jay Andrews, is unlike most that you'll find at the Edinburgh Fringe. The venue is intimate – literally a garden shed – with just half-a-dozen audience members sitting around a table, alongside Andrews herself. And it's emotionally intimate too, exploring feelings of grief and helplessness which we often try to conceal. There is no room to hide anything in this tiny space… and as Andrews plays recordings of women telling stories of loss, she offers gentle permission to feel the emotions some of us habitually suppress.

Review by Richard Stamp published on Wednesday 5 September | Read more

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