We're still publishing reviews from Fringe 2018. We're sorry about the delay, but if we saw your show on a press ticket, there will be a write-up. Do get in touch with us if you have any questions.

The Isle of Muck Theatre

With Victorian clothing and a lack of wifi, The Isle of Muck is a drama set to make you reflect on your own use of social media. The Bluetooth Kevin Theatre company presents us with a story about how important it is to step aside from the internet and spend time with others; it’s a comedic play offering a fresh look on how to cope with an addiction, and why human interaction is so vital.

Review by Abi Love published on Thursday 23 August | Read more

After Today Theatre

Bill Grundy sits swinging in a swivel chair, swigging from a hip flask and reflecting on the wreckage of his life. If you've heard of Grundy at all, it'll be because of the Sex Pistols: he's the hapless besuited interviewer who inexplicably goaded them into a flurry of obscenities, live on 1970's teatime TV. The episode cost him his job and his career, and we see him now – deliciously, hilariously – reduced to presenting a show called Close Up On Castles, a lunchtime filler which is clearly just as pointless as it sounds.

Review by Richard Stamp published on Thursday 23 August | Read more

War With the Newts Theatre

Come aboard the vessel that birthed a new age – and hear a story of mass migration, broken pacts and moral dilemmas – in this immersive piece of theatre. Based on Karel Čapek's 1936 dystopian novel of the same name, this production stands out amongst the 3,000 shows of the Edinburgh Fringe for more than its unusual title.

Review by Jane Bristow published on Thursday 23 August | Read more

Bride of the Gulf Theatre

The Bride of the Gulf is Basra; the southern Iraqi city which many in this country know only as the British base of operations after the 2003 war. This play by from the US-based Thinkery and Verse aims to redress that ignorance, portraying life in Basra in the years following the British withdrawal and bringing genuine Iraqi voices to the fore. A collaboration between American playwright J M Meyer and Iraqi poet and painter Elham Al Zabaedy, the piece has also embraced considerable input from students in Iraq.

Review by Richard Stamp published on Thursday 23 August | Read more

Strangers: Mindreader

Strangers: Mindreader is a spin-off from Strangers: A Magic Play, a show from a couple of years back which successfully combined stage illusion with short theatrical vignettes. This version is different: just one performance fills the whole hour, and while there's a thin veneer of back-story, what we're watching looks like a fairly conventional magic show. But in the world of illusion, of course, nothing's ever entirely the way it seems.

Review by Richard Stamp published on Thursday 23 August | Read more

I Can't Do This Comedy

Lewis Goody admits it may have been a mistake to put his show in the comedy section of the programme. It's not that Goody isn't funny – he has some silly funny moments in him – but his show is one of those hard-to-pin-down comedy-rap-theatre fusions. Armed with a series of props and a loop pedal, Goody bares all, in some ways more literally than metaphorically.

Review by Liam McKenna published on Thursday 23 August | Read more

Our Boys Theatre

Our Boys starts with a montage: the kind of montage you'll see in many a military-themed show. A group of men salute, march, shoulder arms in unison; it's an impressive display of precision and soldierly technique. But then, just seconds into the action, the order devolves into chaos. A bomb has gone off in Afghanistan – and for these young men, the war is over.

Review by Richard Stamp published on Thursday 23 August | Read more

Elsie Thatchwick Theatre

At the tender age of 17, with the passing away of her Nan, young Elsie from Glasgow discovers that her family knows who her Dad is. And what’s more, he is alive! What follows is the story of Elsie trying to come to terms with this new information, using her support system to get to meet her father, and the events thereafter.

Review by Udita Banerjee published on Thursday 23 August | Read more

Speechless Comedy

Set in a world where speaking out for comical effect has been banned – where the likes of Jacob Rees-Mogg have seized control of the country – a student sketch group attempts to defy the law, by creating a loophole of a show centred around completely wordless skits.

Review by Liam McKenna published on Thursday 23 August | Read more

Clouds Theatre

The audience are welcomed to a small and cosy space. There are cushions, pretty fairy lights, and live music as a woman serenades our arrival. Clouds is a story-telling experience – one that mesmerises its listeners and allows imagination to run wild. With this free show, Lana Burns creates a peaceful setting where people can relax and enjoy a collection of stories, making for a serene and calming 50 minutes.

Review by Abi Love published on Thursday 23 August | Read more

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