Waiting for a review of your show? We do have a few still to publish – they're working their way through our system and should all be out by the end of the weekend. We're sorry for the delay, and thank you for your patience.

Penetrator Theatre

3 stars

Presented by Glasgow-based company Fear No Colours, this version of Anthony Neilson's 1993 play uses dark humour to reveal the intense experiences of urban youth, as well as the damaging effects of war on soldiers who come home.

Review by Udita Banerjee published on Sunday 10 September | Read more

Dad's Army Radio Hour Comedy

5 stars

Dad’s Army Radio Hour is a live audio performance, featuring two classic episodes of the much-loved comedy show. With just two men performing all of the roles, it’s time to travel to Walmington-on-Sea… and find out what trouble Mainwaring and company have got themselves into now.

Review by Caroline Cawley published on Sunday 10 September | Read more

Occam's Chainsaw Theatre

2 stars

The film Reservoir Dogs comes to mind when watching Occam’s Chainsaw, and given that the film is a favourite of mine, I had high hopes for Airborne Theatre’s crime-influenced performance. Things certainly started well, with a gripping concept and talented cast – so you can understand my disappointment when the characters got tangled in a desperately unclear plot.

Review by Abi Love published on Sunday 10 September | Read more

Empty Shoes Theatre

3 stars

This seems to be the year of mental-health-related shows at the Fringe – and seeing as 1 in 4 adults will go through an episode of mental illness during their lives, it's great to be finding the time to talk about these issues. Effective Drum Productions adds to the discussion with this solo show about a man’s struggle with depression.

Review by Udita Banerjee published on Sunday 10 September | Read more

Thrill Me: The Leopold and Loeb Story Musicals & Opera

5 stars

This moody musical, written in the early 2000's by New Yorker Stephen Dolginoff, is based on a true story – the 1924 murder of a 14-year-old boy in Chicago, by two privileged law students attempting to commit the "perfect crime".

Review by Caroline Cawley published on Sunday 10 September | Read more

Morgan Stern Theatre

2 stars

Is he dead? A respectably-dressed man in Georgian apparel is lying there on the stage; a solitary chair is the sole accompaniment, and the only prop in this 75-minute production.

Review by Mike Lee published on Sunday 10 September | Read more

Kate Butch in Kate If You Wanna Go Butcher Comedy

3 stars

Kate Butch describes herself as "the Comic Sans of drag", and this – Kate If You Wanna Go Butcher – is her first solo show at the Fringe. Mixing songs, comedy and recollections, we find out when she first knew she was gay, and why Mid Life Crisis is her favourite porn film.

Review by Caroline Cawley published on Thursday 7 September | Read more

War of the Sperms Theatre

3 stars

A comedy from Norwich-based Irstead Theatre, War of the Sperms chronicles the lives of a fresh batch of sperm, following their education and their journey to the womb and the all-important egg. The newly-created sperm are played by a group of actors, who burst on to stage dressed in white, with tails sewn on to their leggings or shorts and wearing swim caps – a simple yet effective costume.

Review by Caroline Cawley published on Thursday 7 September | Read more

The Missing Girl of Grigglewood Theatre

4 stars

In the tiny town of Grigglewood, a father tells his young children a queer little bedtime story – about two children who decide to go on an adventure, to find the monster’s swing hidden deep in the woods. The next morning the father and Peter discover that Peter’s sister Rose has gone missing during the night. And so begins the frantic and desperate search for The Missing Girl of Grigglewood.

Review by Caroline Cawley published on Sunday 3 September | Read more

The Truman Capote Talk Show Theatre

3 stars

A solo show written and performed by Bob Kingdom, The Truman Capote Talk Show is based around the life of the famous American novelist, screenwriter, playwright and actor. One of the most enigmatic men of the last century, Capote’s rise to fame coincided with the epoch of Hollywood’s golden years – the late 1940’s and 1950’s – and as such he came into contact with everyone who was anyone. Nothing could have suited his gossipy, bitchy persona more.

Review by Caroline Cawley published on Sunday 3 September | Read more

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