This Is Not Culturally Significant Theatre

2 stars

In Adam Scott-Rowley’s This Is Not Culturally Significant, a kaleidoscope of characters lay bare their foibles, desires and vulnerabilities. It's a confrontational one-man show, performed entirely in the nude. But it is almost impossible to discuss the experience of seeing it without considering the impact of its scheduling.

Review by Stephen Walker published on Tuesday 15 August | Read more

Yvette Theatre

4 stars

Yvette's a typical teenage girl: chasing boys, fighting with her mother, growing comfortable with her own sexuality. She can be bubbly and giggly, or can retreat into herself – cutting off the world as teenagers often do. But a man's moved into her mother's home, a man she's been told to call her "uncle". The man wants to spend time alone with Yvette. We can see how this is going to end.

Review by Richard Stamp published on Tuesday 15 August | Read more

Transmission Theatre

3 stars

Transmission affords the opportunity to imagine what it would be like to board a spaceship and leave the planet, knowing you'll never return. This flight of fantasy offers something intriguing and unnerving to those of us who never would or could embark on such a journey. We, the audience, are spoken to as if we are the crew of the Saena, on the first mission to the planet Luxtaterra; the journey will take 84 years, and then it'll take a further four years for a message with the crew's findings to make it back to Earth.

Review by Tamarin Fountain published on Monday 14 August | Read more

Someone Dies at the End Theatre

3 stars

I don’t bat an eyelid any more when someone talks about a "post-apocalyptic" USA; if anything, I feel those times are on us now. Squeaky Wheels have come all the way from America with a show about survivors, banding together in a bunker after a nuclear holocaust. A bit of humour, and a lot of tension and clashing egos, add up to a potentially interesting take on human character faced with extreme trauma.

Review by Udita Banerjee published on Monday 14 August | Read more

Sign of the Times Theatre

4 stars

I didn’t know what to expect from Rumble Theatre’s Sign of the Times. The blurb puts it very simply as "A story about the power of language and the struggle to be heard". So I was very pleased to find that it was a powerful, poignant and heart-warming story; it follows Danny (James Robertson), who is an aspiring sports journalist and happens to be deaf.

Review by Udita Banerjee published on Monday 14 August | Read more

NewsRevue 2017 Comedy

5 stars

NewsRevue was first performed in London in 1979 and has been running continuously ever since, gaining a Guinness World Record for the longest-running live comedy show. The show is performed in London throughout the year, with the cast, director and musical director changing over every six weeks, and material being updated every week. It’s now in its 38th year at the Fringe, so my expectations were very high. I was not disappointed.

Review by Elsa Maishman published on Monday 14 August | Read more

The Inevitable Quiet of the Crash Musicals & Opera

3 stars

I first came across Leoe and Hyde at Buxton Fringe with their stunning musical The Marriage of Kim K (also here in Edinburgh). The Inevitable Quiet of the Crash is an altogether darker piece of musical theatre, and though it doesn't hit the same sustained heights, it is similarly ambitious and never less than interesting.

Review by Stephen Walker published on Monday 14 August | Read more

Bump Theatre

3 stars

Lily has hit a bump; on the cusp of entering the big post-university world, she finds herself pregnant and adrift. From the abortion clinic’s waiting room, she contemplates her journey into womanhood.

Returning home with vague ideas of becoming a writer, Lily is pleased to hook up with Laura – her best friend from school – and hit the town to revisit their old haunts. But Laura has moved on, and has new friend Maxine in tow. Three’s a crowd and Lily is left alone in the club, drinking too much. Soon there is a hook-up of a different kind, and there are consequences to be faced.

Review by Stephen Walker published on Monday 14 August | Read more

A Touch of Mrs Robinson

3 stars

There’s nothing that draws a crowd quite like Mrs Robinson. At 5:15pm, Greenside’s Ivy Studio was packed to the rafters with Baby Boomers with drinks in hand, who all were ready to be touched by pop culture’s most famous cougar. Billed as a funny, provocative and inspirational show, A Touch of Mrs Robinson hits a few of its marks, but misses a few too.

Review by Ellen Macpherson published on Monday 14 August | Read more

Becoming Scheherazade Theatre

4 stars

The art of storytelling is an ancient one. Drawing inspiration from the 1001 tales of the Arabian Nights, Kamaal Hussein presents the story of his life – of a boy born in Baghdad to an Iraqi-Canadian couple, and growing up in 60s and 70s Britain. Interspersed with the tales of seven voyages of Sindbad and set in the atmospheric Anatomy Lecture theatre at Summerhall, the show feels very much like a campfire tale in the oasis of a Persian desert.

Review by Udita Banerjee published on Monday 14 August | Read more

Pages